Growing, Cooking… Eating

lg_vegetables

As I drove out through the Carnation valley this morning under a brilliant blue sky, Starbucks in hand, the sun streaming through the window, country music softly playing in the background… it felt like heaven.

With promises of near 80 degree temps today, I had to remind myself we are only in April. The beginning of April mind you. Unbelievable for this notoriously rainy climate.

The fields in the Valley were just beginning to awaken from their winter slumber, the John Deer tractors painting artistic strokes through the loamy earth, the fragrance of new beginnings wafted through the windows. And I thought about my garden, my small suburban backyard raised garden that I’m ever so much in love with.

Already lettuce, spinach, and kale are beginning to emerge, the trellises are in place… waiting for those spring vines. And blank spaces are prepped and ready for later plants and vegetables.

And I’m inspired, thanks to a new read.

Grow, Cook, Eat by Willi Galloway is a must read for anyone interested in gardening. A practical guide for vegetables and herbs that I’m following this year in my own garden. As well as great tips for preserving the fruits of your labor and for preparing delectable meals from it.

“From sinking a seed into the soil through to sitting down to enjoy a meal made with vegetables and fruits harvested right outside your back door, this gorgeous kitchen gardening book is filled with practical, useful information for both novices and seasoned gardeners alike. Grow Cook Eat will inspire people who already buy fresh, seasonal, local, organic food to grow the food they love to eat. For those who already have experience getting their hands dirty in the garden, this handbook will help them refine their gardening skills and cultivate gourmet quality food. The book also fills in the blanks that exist between growing food in the garden and using it in the kitchen with guides to 50 of the best-loved, tastiest vegetables, herbs, and small fruits. The guides give readers easy-to-follow planting and growing information, specific instructions for harvesting all the edible parts of the plant, advice on storing food in a way that maximizes flavor, basic preparation techniques, and recipes. The recipes at the end of each guide help readers explore the foods they grow and demonstrate how to use unusual foods, like radish greens, garlic scapes, and green coriander seeds.”

Willi Galloway’s website: DigginFood

Written by