Homestyle and Pan-Seared German Chicken Schnitzel

Homestyle and Pan-Seared German Chicken Schnitzel | 31Daily.com

While veal is the traditional choice for authentic German Wiener Schnitzel, chicken or pork is an easy and delicious substitution.

And this pan-seared schnitzel is a lightened up version of the favorite fried cutlets, yet is just as tender and yummy as its counterpart.

This quintessential German dish actually finds its roots in Austria – Vienna (“Wien”) and cutlet (“schnitzel”), but is a favorite among Austrians and Germans alike and is traditionally served with a warm potato salad and often, lingonberry jam.

RELATED: Authentic German Austrian Spaetzle with Caramelized Onions

Notable chef Wolfgang Puck reminiscences:

All through my childhood, if it was Sunday I knew that Wiener schnitzel or fried chicken was on the lunch menu. And boy, was I happy! I’ve always loved fried foods, from their beautiful mahogany color and their crunchy coating to the tender, juicy meat inside.

An easy under 30-minute meal, perfect for Sundays — international meal nights — and Oktoberfest.

And a perfect dessert pairing? Apple Kuchen!

RELATED: 19 Around the World Cabbage Recipes

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Homestyle and Pan-Seared German Chicken Schnitzel

Homestyle and Pan-Seared German Chicken Schnitzel | 31Daily.com

While veal is the traditional choice for authentic German Wiener Schnitzel, chicken or pork is an easy and delicious substitution. And this pan-seared schnitzel is a lightened up version of the favorite fried cutlets, yet is just as tender and yummy as its counterpart.

  • Author: Stephanie Wilson
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x
  • Category: Main Dish
  • Cuisine: German Austrian
Scale

Ingredients

4 (6-ounce) skinless, boneless thinly sliced chicken breasts
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/8 teaspoon cayenne
1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 cup milk
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1 cup Panko Crumbs
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
Cooking spray
1 tablespoon canola oil

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350-degrees.

Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil. Spray with non-stick cooking spray.

Season chicken cutlets with salt and freshly ground pepper.

Create 3 shallow dishes for dredging and dipping:

1. 1/2 cup flour with 1/8 teaspoons cayenne and nutmeg
2. 1/4 cup milk and 1 egg, lightly beaten
3. Combined Panko crumbs, parsley, and garlic powder

Dredge chicken cutlets first in flour mixture, followed by a dip in the milk/egg mixture and finally dredge in panko mixture, shaking off excess.

Heat a large nonstick skillet (I used a 12-inch cast iron skillet) over medium-high heat. Add canola oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add 2 chicken breast halves to pan; cook 2-3 minutes on each side until nicely browned. Remove chicken from skillet and place on baking sheet. Continue with remaining 2 chicken breast cutlets, adding more oil if necessary.

Bake chicken in a 350-degree oven and allow to cook for another 15 minutes or until chicken is done.

Keywords: schnitzel, german recipes, german food, chicken schnitzel, chicken, chicken breast

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6 thoughts on “Homestyle and Pan-Seared German Chicken Schnitzel

  1. Mickey

    Really good. Reminds me of my omas food. My kids loved it too!

    1. Thanks so much, Mickey! Love oma’s food!!

  2. Nicole

    I have made this 4 times now and it is hands down the best schnitzel,
    Thank you for sharing your recipe.

    1. Thank you, Nicole! My guys love it too!!

  3. Becky

    Hi! Do you know if this can be done ahead of time (except for the baking maybe?) and finished off in the oven? I am looking for recipes forma crowd for an Octoberfest. Thanks for any tips!

    1. Hi Becky! That’s a great question. I have not made these ahead. What I do know is that any meat that has been breaded and then refrigerated will draw moisture from the meat, leaving it dry and the breading soggy. The best results are to freeze breaded meats as quickly as possible, thus preserving moisture. What I’m not sure about is oven baking them. If you try it — I know the readers and I would love to hear the results!!

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