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Royal Currant Scones Recipe

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A Royal Currant Scones Recipe, from the archives of Queen Elizabeth, to serve with afternoon tea, or anytime you’re craving an authentic British style scone.

Closeup side view of Royal Currant Scones

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Queen Elizabeth is known for her love of afternoon tea. In fact, we’ve written several posts about Her Majesty, including Queen Elizabeth Afternoon Tea Recipes as well as general etiquette for Taking Afternoon Tea Like the British.

These scones are based on Queen Elizabeth’s Royal Recipe for Fruit Scones, reputed to be her favorite.

In that article, it’s written:

Every year at Garden Parties across The Royal Residences, over 27,000 cups of tea, 20,000 sandwiches and 20,000 slices of cakes are consumed! The Royal Pastry Chefs are happy to share their recipe for fruit scones, which traditionally would be served at Buckingham Palace every summer. 

The Royal Family website
Top view of a Royal Currant Scone on a plate

And if you’re wondering what kind of tea to enjoy with these scones, take a cue from Queen Elizabeth. It’s said her favorite tea is Asam or Earl Grey Tea, both of which would be delicious.

Side vertical view of Royal Currant Scone

Adapting the Royal Currant Scones Recipe

I’ve adapted the Royal Family Dried Fruit Scones recipe to U.S. measurements with a couple of tweaks for further clarity. However, you can use the link above to view the original recipe and adapt it to your preferences.

Ingredients for Royal Currant Scones Recipe

Ingredients for Royal Currant Scones

Specific ingredient measurements are in the recipe card at the bottom of this post, but here is a summary of the ingredients.

  • Sultanas or dried currants (soaked)
  • All-purpose flour
  • Baking powder
  • Salt
  • Butter
  • Sugar
  • Large eggs
  • Buttermilk

How to Make Royal Currant Scones Recipe

These currant scones are easy to make but do require a couple of extra steps. Steps that are well worth the effort as they yield a deliciously tender scone.

Begin by soaking the dried currants in hot water for 30 minutes.

While they are soaking, preheat the oven to 400 degrees F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Step 1: Mixing dry ingredients and cutting in the butter

Mix the flour, baking powder, butter, sugar, and salt in a large bowl until pea-sized crumbs are formed.

Step 2: Finishing the scone dough

In a separate bowl whisk together eggs and buttermilk. Add the egg mixture and soaked currants to the flour mixture and mix until smooth.

Step 3: Resting the scones

Transfer the dough to a floured surface, cover, and let rest for 20 minutes.

Unbaked Royal Currant Scones on a Baking Sheet

Step 4: Baking the scones

Roll out the dough to a 1-inch thickness and cut in the desired shape. I’m using a 2-inch round biscuit cutter. Transfer the scones to the prepared baking sheet and let rest another 5 minutes. Brush with egg wash.

Bake for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown. Cool and serve with jam and clotted cream.

Tips for Making Currant Scones

Why should scones rest before baking?

While it seems like an extract step, resting scone dough allows the gluten to relax and helps make taller, smoother scones. Feel free to refrigerate the dough overnight for crisper edges.

Is it necessary to brush the scones with an egg wash?

Absolutely not u002du002d however, brushing the tops with a beaten egg wash brings beautiful color and texture to the scones.

What is the difference between Sultanas, currants, and raisins?

All three are sweet dried fruit grown from different varieties of the vine grape. And, they can be used interchangeably in this scones recipe. But there are slight differences.

Raisins are the largest and are dried naturally. Sultanas are made from seedless green grapes and are often the juiciest. Currants are made from the smallest grape varieties. They are also called Zante currants or Corinth currants. Not to be confused with Black currants, which are a type of berry.

If you Love Afternoon Tea

We take teatime seriously. And have written recipes and ideas to help you enjoy it as much as we do. From simple steps to hosting your own tea, to teatime recipes for seasons throughout the year.

Here are some of our favorites and most popular afternoon tea posts:

More Scones Recipes

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Royal Currant Scones with raspberry jam and clotted cream
Closeup side view of Royal Currant Scones

Royal Currant Scones Recipe

A Royal Currant Scones Recipe, from the archives of Queen Elizabeth, to serve with afternoon tea, or anytime you're craving an authentic British style scone.
4.6 from 10 votes
Print Pin Save
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 8 minutes
Total Time: 23 minutes
Servings: 12 servings
Author: Stephanie Wilson

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup dried currants or Sultanas soak in hot water for 30 minutes
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 8 tablespoons butter 1/2 cup, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • egg wash for brushing scones

Instructions

  • Soak dried currants in hot water for 30 minutes.
  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • Mix the flour, baking powder, butter, sugar, and salt in a large bowl until pea-sized crumbs are formed.
  • In a separate bowl whisk together eggs and buttermilk. Add the egg mixture and soaked currants to the flour mixture and mix until smooth.
  • Transfer the dough to a floured surface, cover, and let rest for 20 minutes.
  • Roll out the dough to a 1-inch thickness and cut in the desired shape. I'm using a 2-inch round biscuit cutter. Transfer the scones to the prepared baking sheet and let rest another 5 minutes. Brush with egg wash.
  • Bake for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown. Cool and serve with jam and clotted cream.

Video

Nutrition

Calories: 241kcal | Carbohydrates: 36g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Trans Fat: 0.3g | Cholesterol: 48mg | Sodium: 389mg | Potassium: 106mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 11g | Vitamin A: 294IU | Vitamin C: 0.3mg | Calcium: 116mg | Iron: 2mg

Nutritional information is only an estimate. The accuracy of the nutritional information for any recipe on this site is not guaranteed.

Tried this recipe? Pin it Today!Follow me on Pinterest for more and use the "Pin" button at the top of the recipe card.
Course: Scones
Cuisine: British
Keyword: british scones, british scones recipe, currant scones, scone recipe, scones

21 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I recently had a Royal Tea at my home. A VERY picky eater hesitantly took a scone, broke it in half, and topped each half with Devonshire Cream and Bonne Maman’s raspberry jam. One bite and her eyes lit up and she declared them the best scones she had ever eaten. She ate TWO! I always make these for my guests and will continue to do so. Thank you for posting this recipe!!

    1. That makes me SO happy! Thank you for sharing, trying the recipe, and for serving them at your Royal Tea!

  2. Just made my first batch for our Authentic Afternoon Tea with the Royals for a fundraiser for our Women’s Club! I ended up with 16 scones! They turned out beautifully for an amateur even though I rolled them out too thin and repatted them out to a thicker size! Thank you for an easy to follow recipe! I am making 64 so I should have a better ranking than amateur!

    1. Hi Karen! I would definitely say your are NOT an amateur. I’m so impressed with 64 scones. Good job! Have fun at your Royal Tea and thank you for using this recipe for your special occassion.

    1. Hi Paula— you were not missing anything! Thank you for letting me know. The recipe card had, for some reason, fallen off. It’s back on with a “Jump to Recipe” button at the top of the post.

    1. Hi Sylvia! I’m so glad you enjoyed them! I’m making a batch for tomorrow’s tea too. Thank you for letting me know how you liked the scones ❤️.

    1. I’m SO glad you enjoyed these scones, Tina! I’m making another batch for tea this weekend. Thank you for trying them.

  3. While I am sure you’re recipe is wonderful, I just wanted to say that currants are not a variety of grapes. Currants are berries. They are frequently used interchangeably, but they are different.

    1. Thank you, Philip, for your comment pointing out the distinction between currants and Black currants. As noted, Black currants are a type of berry. I’ve made that more clear in the post.

    1. Thank you, Andree. I’ve updated the recipe card and included metric measurements if needed. Thank you!

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